Writing

Courtesy Lumiere Press.

Courtesy Lumiere Press.

Steichen: Eduard et Voulangis: The Early Modernist Period 1915 – 1923

"The book that evolved from the discovery of these prints, “Eduard et Voulangis,” is one of the finest samples of an artist-in-residence, in this case, the artist’s own residence in Voulangis, just outside of Paris. Steichen would use this time that Greenberg called “a great artist’s most contemplative period” to evaluate, create, and innovate."

A review of Lumiere Press' book of Steichen photographs, Steichen: Eduard et Voulangis: The Early Modernist Period 1915 – 1923.  Originally published in Parenthesis.

Read the review here.


Alex Katz, “Homage to Monet 5,” 2009, oil on board, 9 x 12 in. (22.9 x 30.5cm). Courtesy the artist and Peter Blum Gallery, New York.

Alex Katz, “Homage to Monet 5,” 2009, oil on board, 9 x 12 in. (22.9 x 30.5cm). Courtesy the artist and Peter Blum Gallery, New York.

Alex Katz: Small Paintings 1987-2013

"…you can approach the paintings more casually, with a feeling of ease—with the sense that these are sketches for larger works. There is less to recognize. There is less formality. There is less area to navigate. The less here feels more."

A review published on Tilted Arc of a recent show of small works by Alex Katz at Peter Blum Gallery.

Read the review here.


Gordon Moore, “Untitled (with Green)”, 2013. Oil, pumice and latex on canvas. 78 x 54 1/4 inches. © Gordon Moore.

Gordon Moore, “Untitled (with Green)”, 2013. Oil, pumice and latex on canvas. 78 x 54 1/4 inches.
© Gordon Moore.

Gordon Moore: On Dimensionality

"There’s something about the deceptively flat blocks he uses as a foundation for the paintings. I get lost in their subtle variations of tone, only to be jolted out of my contemplation by incredible marks or lines that carry the weight of depth with them. It’s in that shift—between the flatness and the depth—that I remember. ... The experience is one of heightened awareness—it testifies to the power of an experienced hand leading his viewer to a safe space to lose themselves."

A review and conversation with painter Gordon Moore on Tilted Arc.

Read more here.

Photo courtesy Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Photo courtesy Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

Off The Wall

"The print—naked without the frame and the context of a formal space surrounding it—quickly succeeds or fails. Instead of looking at a great Robert Adams photograph, I’m simply looking at a print on a table, in the exact same way that I look at my own work, scrutinizing for flaws and moments of salvation."

A piece about the value of the print study room. 

Read more here.


© George Tice. Petit Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, 1974.

© George Tice. Petit Mobil Station, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, 1974.

The Burden of Association

"When the medium born to depict reality, doesn’t. No other art form is capable of producing this kind of exchange—an expectation of an exact record, only to strip that preconception away, leaving form in its place."

A piece about the power of photography.

Read more here.


Dorothea Rockburne, “Installation Piece: Arc.” Carbon Paper, Graphite on Wall, 70 × 60 in. (Dimensions Variable). © Dorothea Rockburne. Image courtesy Dorothea Rockburne and / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. This image is included under the fair use exemption. on canvas. 78 x 54 1/4 inches.

Dorothea Rockburne, “Installation Piece: Arc.” Carbon Paper, Graphite on Wall, 70 × 60 in. (Dimensions Variable). © Dorothea Rockburne. Image courtesy Dorothea Rockburne and / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. This image is included under the fair use exemption. on canvas. 78 x 54 1/4 inches.

Dorothea Rockburne: In Conversation

"I feel the work in my body. I feel it. I don’t know how to exactly express that, how to translate that into language. But most people confuse emotions in art with sentiment, and I’m out to crack that one. It’s not sentiment. Your emotions are something you’re almost born with a complete set of, and most people spend their whole life denying their emotions. But if you develop them, it’s not sentiment, it’s strength."

A conversation between myself, Richard Benari and artist Dorothea Rockburne.

Read more here.


© Steven Holl. Courtesy Steven Holl Architects.

© Steven Holl. Courtesy Steven Holl Architects.

Steven Holl: An Interview

"In 1988, in your book, Anchoring, you stated, “The site of a building is more than a mere ingredient of its conception. It is its physical and metaphysical foundation. Building transcends physical and functional requirements by fusing with a place, by gathering the meaning of a situation. Architecture does not so much intrude on the landscape as it serves to explain it. Architecture and site should have an experiential connection, a metaphysical link, a poetic link.” Do you still feel this way?"

My interview with architect Steven Holl.

Read more here.